Start typing a topic or an audience to see what we offer

Capitol Region Education Council

Headlines

Local Children Benefit from Seamless Summer Food Program CREC Locations in Hartford and East Hartford

CREC has partnered with the federally funded Seamless Summer Option (SSO) food program. This free meal service, made available through the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), provides nutritious meals at no charge to all children 18 years and under at the following sites

CREC Students Experience Traditional Summer Camp Through Camp Jewell YMCA Scholarship Program

(Colebrook, CT) Ten-year-old Hartford resident Ezequiel Lopez was annoyed four summers ago when his mom first signed him up for overnight camp at Camp Jewell YMCA in Colebrook.“The first year I didn’t want to go. I wanted to stay home and play video games. When I got here, it was pretty cool. They had a farm and a waterfront. I could go swimming,” said Ezequiel, who goes to school in Windsor Locks through the Hartford Region Open Choice program.Ezequiel quickly grew excited about being at camp and was so eager to return the following year that he packed his bag a month in advance. This is his fourth summer at Camp Jewell YMCA and he plans on returning “till I’m a camp counselor.”Ezequiel is among dozens of students in a CREC-managed program or CREC magnet school who are attending the camp free of charge through scholarships offered by Camp Jewell YMCA. CREC received spots this summer for 100 kids, some of which CREC shared with Hartford Public Schools and community organizations.The scholarship program is part of an effort to serve kids from Greater Hartford and to bring diversity to the camp. The initiative started in 2012 after program leaders realized that hardly any of their campers came from Hartford or New Britain.“We are the YMCA of Greater Hartford and we should be serving kids from Greater Hartford,” said Ray Zetye, Executive Director of Camp Jewell YMCA.Ray sees the program benefitting all campers, not just those attending on scholarship. Diversity, he said, exposes kids to different life experiences and prepares them for the years ahead when they interact with people from varying backgrounds.“We’re creating more empathetic adults through this program,” said Ray. “My dream is to have a cabin with a couple of kids from Hartford, three or four kids from the suburbs, a kid from Spain. I want to have religious diversity, all different dimensions of diversity.” Camp Jewell YMCA is set on 540 acres of majestic woodlands right next to a lake. Although kids follow a rigid daily schedule, they choose which activities to participate in. Their options include, horseback riding, theater, pottery, archery, swimming, boating, outdoor cooking, among other traditional camp activities.Ezequiel enthusiastically described playing Zombie Apocalypse, similar to a game of tag where players become zombies when they are touched by other zombies.This is also the fourth summer at camp for Jada Mann, a 12-year-old from CREC Two Rivers Middle School. Jada enjoys candle-making, swimming. She’s taken basketball clinics, and practiced outdoor cooking. Her favorite thing about camp is making friends.Seven-year-old Uriel Vaughn is experiencing his first year here. He is, “Excited because it’s very cool.”“For a lot our kids, it’s their first time being outside of an urban environment or being away from their families. They get to explore a new environment, make friends and learn to be self-sufficient,” said Eric Crawford, director of the CREC Trude Mero Family Resource Center, during a site visit at the camp last week. Crawford and his staff manage the camp scholarships given to CREC. They recruit students to attend and make routine site visits to check up on the kids.The initiative started with approximately 10 students. It’s grown to about 450, with scholarships offered to students through organizations like CREC, Hartford Public Library, International Institute of Connecticut, Legacy Foundation, and Catholic Charities.Approximately 1,300 kids between the ages of 7 and 16 from Greater Hartford to Fairfield County, as well as China, Spain and the Dominican Republic, participate in the residential camp program each year. The program runs four two-week sessions between June and August.###The Capitol Region Education Council was established in 1966. Working with and for its member districts, CREC has developed a wide array of cost-effective and high-quality programs and services to meet the educational needs of children and adults in the region. CREC brings nearly five decades of experience in education, regional collaboration, and operations to provide innovative strategies and products that address the changings needs of school districts and their students, corporations, non-profits, and individual professions. CREC regularly serves 36 towns in Greater Hartford, offering more than 120 programs to more than 150,000 students annually. CREC manages more than 35 facilities throughout the area, including 16 interdistrict magnet schools. More information about CREC and CREC’s award-winning schools is available at www.crec.org.

Mobility Program Provides Rewarding Experience for Students at CREC Academy of Science and Innovation, Central Connecticut State University

(New Britain, CT) One of the best experiences that Lorette Feivelson had during her time at CREC Academy of Science and Innovation was helping to modify an electric toy car for an 18-month old girl with limited mobility. The girl, Parker, was very hesitant getting into the car, but that soon changed.“You should have seen the look on this girl’s face. She had the biggest smile. Once she figured it out she did not want to get out of the car,” said Feivelson, who graduated from CREC ASI this week. “This was one of the best experiences of my high school career. It was fun and empowering for me, but also rewarding and a chance to give back.”For the second year in a row, students from CREC ASI and Central Connecticut State University teamed up for the Go Baby Go! program. In April, they adapted six motorized toy cars to fit the needs of kids with disabilities. The cars were donated to children who were identified by physical and occupational therapists. Go Baby Go! is designed to give children with limited mobility the ability to move around independently. Founded by the University of Delaware, the program was brought to CCSU approximately three years ago by Michele Dischino, associate professor of technology and engineering education at CCSU.CREC ASI hosted Go Baby Go! for the first time last year, said Gina Gadue, theme coach and instructional specialist at the magnet high school. CREC ASI students, with guidance and instruction from CCSU students, helped build eight cars. The program great that the school wanted to host again this year.The kids love participating in this event. It is so rewarding for them to work on a car for a child that they then get to meet. They are able to see firsthand the child's limitations and know that because they were able to work with others to adapt the car the child gets to enjoy it safely. The best part is to see the smile on the children’s and the parents’ faces,” said Gadue.“The relationship has been so beneficial all around,” said Dischino. “It’s a great opportunity to work with students, especially in doing something that is benefitting another human being.”The cars are modified depending on the child’s needs. Extra supports and padding may be added, safety harnesses are installed and the framework is sometimes adapted. The most common change is to the accelerator.“Normally, you operate the car by pressing the accelerator with your foot, but most children can’t use their feet or have limited mobility,” said Dischino. “We rewire the accelerator function so all the child needs to do is press a big button.”If someone asked Feivelson, who became involved in the program through Ms. Gadue, to participate in Go Baby Go! again, “I would say yes in a heartbeat!”For more information about Go Baby Go!, visit http://www.udel.edu/gobabygo/ or contact Michele Dischino at dischinomic@ccsu.edu.###The Capitol Region Education Council was established in 1966. Working with and for its member districts, CREC has developed a wide array of cost-effective and high-quality programs and services to meet the educational needs of children and adults in the region. CREC brings nearly five decades of experience in education, regional collaboration, and operations to provide innovative strategies and products that address the changings needs of school districts and their students, corporations, non-profits, and individual professions. CREC regularly serves 36 towns in Greater Hartford, offering more than 120 programs to more than 150,000 students annually. CREC manages more than 35 facilities throughout the area, including 17 interdistrict magnet schools. More information about CREC and CREC’s award-winning schools is available at www.crec.org.

CREC Metropolitan Learning Center Leo Club Raises Funds for Guide Dog Harness

(Bloomfield, CT) The CREC Metropolitan Learning Center Leo Club recently sponsored a highly successful fundraising campaign to purchase a harness for a Fidelco guide dog. “It is this level of thoughtfulness and kindness that creates the opportunities to help communities. MLC Leos have engaged in projects at local and international levels through this awareness and commitment,” said Constanza Paramo, liaison for the MLC Leo Club and the Bloomfield Lions Club.Club members sold wristbands inscribed in Braille with “MLC Leo” that allowed students to dress casually for the day rather than wear the required school uniform. Proceeds from the “dress down” fundraiser will cover the cost of a guide dog harness with a plaque saying, “Donated by MLC Leos 2017.”Fidelco guide dogs undergo 24 months of intensive training before they are given to a vision-impaired person to assist them with their independence and freedom. The harness will be given to a dog once it completes its training.The MLC Leo Club, which was founded in 2011, is proudly sponsored by the Bloomfield Lions Club for the purpose of developing young student citizens willing to serve communities at local and global levels. Leo Club members are characterized for having a personal drive and keen willingness to support school and community causes that make a positive difference in people’s lives. Prior to the Fidelco campaign, the MLC Leos made a significant contribution to the rebuilding of the “Jose Acevedo Elementary School” in the Philippines which had been devastated by the Haiyan Typhoon. ###The Capitol Region Education Council was established in 1966. Working with and for its member districts, CREC has developed a wide array of cost-effective and high-quality programs and services to meet the educational needs of children and adults in the region. CREC brings nearly five decades of experience in education, regional collaboration, and operations to provide innovative strategies and products that address the changings needs of school districts and their students, corporations, non-profits, and individual professions. CREC regularly serves 36 towns in Greater Hartford, offering more than 120 programs to more than 150,000 students annually. CREC manages more than 35 facilities throughout the area, including 17 interdistrict magnet schools. More information about CREC and CREC’s award-winning schools is available at www.crec.org.

See more CREC News →

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Late RSCO Lottery Application

Closes July 31

The 2017-2018 Late Regional School Choice Office (RSCO) lottery application is now open. Families interested in applying may submit a late application for select schools.

Apply Now

©2017 Capitol Region Education Council
111 Charter Oak Avenue, Hartford, CT 06106   •   (860) 247-CREC

CREC Webmail | Intranet

Policies and Procedures | Disclaimers | Press Room | Careers | Contact Us